Have you ever been thankful for crisp fruit, jelly on toast, or a particularly nice glass of wine? Thank a grape, especially a patented grape.

Gratitude
United States Patent PP25,746, has been been granted for a Grape plant named `Gratitude.` `Gratitude`originated from a hand-pollinated cross of A-1925 (non-patented, non-released breeding genotype; female).times.A-1581 (non-patented, non-released breeding genotype; male). This new grapevine cultivar can be distinguished by its seedless, green, crisp berries with neutral flavor and resists cracking from rainfall at maturity. The fruit grows in large tight clusters, the vines have medium vigor, and the plants are healthy.

The most distinctive features of the Gratitude cultivar are its seedless, crisp, green, thin-skinned berries with neutral flavor, ripening late season with resistance to fruit cracking from rainfall at maturity. The grapes grow in large, tight clusters with medium vigor on a healthy plant. The fruit clusters are considered large in size, good for commercial markets, and the variety is also intended for home garden planting.

Gratitude originated from a hand-pollinated cross of A-1925 (non-patented, non-released genotype; female parent).times.A-1581 (non-patented, non-released breeding genotype; male parent) made in 1991 near Clarksville, Arkansas. The instant cultivar is a hybrid of Vitis labrusca L. and Vitis vinifera L. The seeds resulting from this controlled hybridization were germinated in a greenhouse during the winter of 1991-92. Resulting seedlings were planted in the spring of 1992 in a vineyard near Clarksville, and those seedlings fruited in the summer of 1994. One seedling, designated Arkansas Selection 2505, became Gratitude.

During late 1994 and early 1995, the original plant selection was propagated asexually at the above-noted location, by rooting hardwood cuttings and a test planting of three vines was established. In all propagations hardwood cuttings were used and the instant cultivar rooted readily from hardwood cuttings. All propagules (resulting plants) of the instant cultivar have been observed to be true to type in that during all asexual multiplication, the vegetative and fruit characteristics of the original plant have been maintained. All vines planted from hardwood cutting propagation fruited in the second or third season of growth in the vineyard after planting.

Faith
The new cultivar “Faith” ripens its fruit in the early season, from late July to early August. The medium-sized fruit is oval and blue in color at early maturity. It is evenly colored within the cluster. Fruit skins adhere to the flesh (has a non-slipskin texture). The flavor is neutral with an occasional slight fruity flavor. Solids concentration of the juice at fruit maturity averages 19% with medium acidity. The fruit is of the stenospermocarpic type of seedlessness and can contain 1-2 small, soft vestigial seed traces that are not noticeable when eaten. Fruit clusters, borne usually one to two per shoot, are medium sized with an average weight of 150 to 250 g. It is moderately resistant to powdery mildew.

Deep blue, non-slipskin grapes. Medium-size fruit grows on sturdy vines. Mellow grape flavor with a light sweet-tartness in the skin. Each cluster weighs an average of 6 to 9 ounces. Seedless. Resists cracking. Ripens in late-July. Self-pollinating. Developed at the University of Arkansas. May be covered by U.S.P.P. #25,696 or other patents.

Hope
Vines of the new “Hope” cultivar have medium vigor, with a procumbent growth habit characteristic of V. labrusca. It has produced well as own-rooted plants in all testing and has not been evaluated on any rootstocks. Hardiness of the vines has been very good, with no winter injury to the vines to 5.degree. F. in the most severe winters at the Arkansas test site. Hope fruits are medium-small, green in color at early maturity, ripening in the mid- to late-season, average August 18. Fruit skins are moderately thick and adhere to the flesh (has a non-slipskin texture). Solids concentration of the juice at fruit maturity averages 20% with medium acidity. The fruit clusters are good sized and vines are very productive.

Consistently high yields. Harvest up to 35 to 50 pounds of sweet, non-slipskin grapes from just one vine! The Firm fruit and tight-clustering make this variety a standout in the vineyard, with individual bunches weighing up to 10 ounces each. Flesh is soft and tender. Seeds are virtually non-existent. Ripens in mid-August. Self-pollinating. Developed by the University of Arkansas. May be covered by U.S.P.P. #25,697 or other patents.

Joy
Joy is a new and distinct cultivar of grapevine originated from a hand-pollinated cross of A-1919 (non-patented, non-released breeding genotype; female parent).times.A-1908 (non-patented, non-released breeding genotype; male parent) made in 1991 near Clarksville, Arkansas. The instant cultivar is a hybrid of Vitis labrusca L. and Vitis vinifera L. The seeds resulting from this controlled hybridization were germinated in a greenhouse during the winter of 1991-92, and the resulting seedlings planted in the spring of 1992 in a vineyard near Clarksville.. The seedlings fruited in the summer of 1993 and one seedling, designated Arkansas Selection 2494, was selected for its seedless, thin-skinned, blue berries of exceptional fruity flavor, large clusters, medium vigor, and healthy plant.

During late 1993 and early 1994, the original plant selection was propagated asexually at the above-noted location, by rooting hardwood cuttings and a test planting of three vines was established. In all propagations hardwood cuttings were used and the instant cultivar rooted readily from hardwood cuttings. All propagules (resulting plants) of the instant cultivar have been observed to be true to type in that during all asexual multiplication, the vegetative and fruit characteristics of the original plant have been maintained. All vines planted from hardwood cutting propagation fruited in the second or third season of growth in the vineyard after planting.

Joy ripens in mid-season, average August 11. The elongated oval, medium sized fruit is blue in color at early maturity. The flavor is excellent and fruity. Solids concentration of th e juice at fruit maturity averages 21.1% with medium acidity.A joy to grow and eat! Exceptionally fruity, thin-skinned blue grapes. Medium-large fruit with a thin skin. Average cluster weighs 10 ounces. Seedless. Resists cracking. Ripens in mid-August. Self-pollinating. Developed by the University of Arkansas. May be covered by U.S.P.P. #25,726 or other patents.

 

 


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